William Boon

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William F. Boon
Born 4 February 1840
Stockport, England
Died 26 November 1914
Monuments Listed, Workers' Memorial
Organization Port Adelaide Co-operative Society
Labor Party


Life

Legacy

External links

Sources

Port Adelaide Library:

Boon William Flitcroft

Name added to East Side of the Workers Mmemorial in 1918
He was nominated by the ALP

William Flitcroft Boon was born in Stockport England, arriving in Australia in around 1888. William was a Grocer.

William married Martha Hannah Howarth. Their children were Edith Emma born February 19 1882 at Queenstown, Harry Howarth born June 29 1893 at Cheltenham, James, Seth and Albert.

William was a member of the St. Paul's (Poet) Men's Society in 1896. contributing songs and other items. 1896

Vice President of the Labor Party 1897

THE FEDERAL BILL OPPOSITION AT PORT ADELAIDE. On Friday evening a meeting to form an Anti-Commonwealth Bill League at Port Adelaide was held in the Friendly Societies' Room, Port Adelaide.

It was moved — that the electors here present believing that the adoption of the Commonwealth Bill would be minimal to the interests of the people of South Australia, hereby resolve to form a league in conjunction with the Adelaide league for the purpose of opposing the measure. Mr G. Duffield seconded. Mr. W. F. Boon supported. He stated that no form of Government could be truly for the welfare of the people unless it was so free that the people's desires could always be made the law of the land. He objected to the Bill because it took away from him and his fellows the liberty he held dear, he trusted the subject would he taken up in a serious sense. The evils of the past, in his opinion, would be reinstated if Federation was to be in the form of the Bill now before the people.

On the motion of Mr. W. F. Boon it was decided that the gentlemen present be the nucleus of the Anti-Commonwealth Bill League with power to add to the number.

Mr. F. Ward moved — That in the opinion of this meeting the Government of South Australia have shown a partisan spirit by delaying the publication of the Commonwealth Bill, and regret they did not accede to the request to defer the poll for three months and also regret that the delegates spoke publicly on the Bill before it was published. Mr. Connell seconded. Carried. Officers were elected thus: —President; Mr. I. McGillivray, M.P.; vice-presidents, Messrs. W. F. Boon and M. Gillies; treasurer, Mr. W. F. Boon; secretary and collector, Mr. F. Ward; assistant secretary, Mr. G. Wilks. Saturday 21 May 1898

W. F. Boon, vice president of the United Labor Party. In 1899

EARLY CLOSING AT PORT ADELAIDE. A public meeting, convened by the Mayor of Port Adelaide (Mr. J. W. Caire) was held in the Port Town Hall on Friday evening to consider the question of the trade of the town in its relation to the Early Closing Act.. Mr. W. Berry moved - "That this meeting is of opinion that in the best interest and welfare of the trade of the town, as well as the most lasting benefit to the assistants employed, depends upon the adoption of a uniform practice of closing of the shops which have been brought under the provisions of the Early Closing Act, 1900. There was no need, he remarked, to apologise for the resolution. They should recognise a uniform day for the benefit of all.

Tradesmen at Port Adelaide did not do so much in six days that they could not cram it into five and a half days. Buyer and seller alike would show their good sense in co-operating to afford the greatest benefit to the greatest number, and that could be accomplished by assisting to bring about a uniform half-holiday. (Cheers.) Mr. W. F. Boon seconded…

PORT ADELAIDE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY. The fifth half-yearly meeting of the Port Adelaide Industrial Co-operative Society, Limited. Mr. W. F. Boon (secretary and manager) informed the shareholders that in addition to the general fund the society had a special fund and an association fund. The society commenced operations with the small amount of £24, and the turn over at present was about £60 weekly. General satisfaction was expressed with the steady progress being made, and a. dividend of ls in the pound was declared to shareholders on their purchases. The following officers were re-elected for the ensuing year:—President, Mr. I. McGillivray; committee of management, secretary and business manager, Mr. W. F. Boon; treasurer, Mr. A. Campbell. A vote of thanks to the officers for services brought the meeting to a close. 1899

The Port Adelaide district organising committee of the United Labor Party formed a local committee with Mr. W. F. Boon as president. 1900

THE UNITED LABOR PARTY. The following nominated for the plebiscite to be taken by the United Labor Party, for the selection of candidates to fill vacancies in the State Parliament: W. F. Boon, G. J. Connell, W. Gilbert,. J. Thompson, and F. Ward. Monday 4 March 1901 Early closing association annual meeting. The following officers were elected for the ensuing twelve months:- The board of management was constituted as follows:- W. F. Boon, 1901

PORT ADELAIDE RELIEF. On Saturday morning the Port Adelaide Working Men's Association distributed at their Dale-street hall 100 loaves of bread and a big collection of clothing, groceries, and vegetables to deserving cases. Another distribution will be made on Tuesday morning. Mr. I. McGillivray, M.P., acknowledges having received on Friday and Saturday on behalf of the association £2 10/ worth of meat and £2 10/ worth of bread from the Adelaide Trades Hall committee, £1 worth, of meat from Dr. Jurs, and the following goods and money:-W. F. Boon, 6 lb. tea. Monday 23 June 1902

Plebiscite 1906

PORT ADELAIDE Co-operative bakery society. The first half-yearly meeting of the Port Adelaide Cooperative Bakery Society was held in the Working Men's Hall, Dale-street on Wednesday evening. Mr. J. E. Stephens presided over a good attendance. There were 420 members, an increase of 127 during the six months. Finances of the society were in a sound state, while the output from the bakery had almost doubled since operations were started. Mr. W. F. Boon spoke on co-operation, and he was heartily thanked. Thursday 29 September 1910

Mr W. F. Boon, manager of the Port Adelaide Co-operative Society. 1910

PORT ADELAIDE INDUSTRIAL CO OPERATIVE SOCIETY. The shareholders, presented the late manager (Mr. W. F. Boon) with a handsome gold watch and chain suitably inscribed, as a token of appreciation of his 16 years of good and faithful service.

BOON. On the 25th November, at Third-avenue, Cheltenham. William Flitcroft, beloved husband of Martha Hannah Boon, aged 65 years, leaving a widow, four sons, and one daughter to mourn their sad loss. For ever with the Lord.1914

Mr. William Flitcroft Boon died at his residence, Cheltenham, on Wednesday morning. He was 65 years of age. He had been in failing health for some time. He was born in Stockport, England, on February 4, 1840. He arrived in South Australia in 1880, accompanied by his wife and three sons. They were passengers by the steamer Sorata, which ran aground near Cape Jervis, at which place the passengers were landed, as the position of the vessel was serious.

Mr. Boon proceeded to Sydney, but almost immediately returned to South Australia, and settled in the Port Adelaide district. About 30 years ago he removed to Cheltenham, where with his family he had resided ever since. The Port Adelaide Co-operative Society came into existence through Mr. Boon's efforts in 1896. He had obtained practical knowledge of co-operation prior to leaving England, and his whole-hearted enthusiasm and business capacity gave the society a sound foundation.

Mr. Boons efforts had a bad effect on his health, and on February 22, 1913, he was relieved of the managerial responsibility, though he still acted as assistant secretary. He was widely known and much beloved by those brought into touch with him. At the time of his retirement from the secretary ship of the society he was presented with an address and a gold watch and chain and medal.

Mr. L. W. George, on behalf of the staff and members, in voicing appreciation of Mr. Boon, said he did not know of any man who would do more than Mr. Boon had done for the society. The struggle during the opening years of their history was borne by Mr. Boon with great courage, and by his untiring efforts he won the admiration and esteem of them all. They felt they could not let the occasion of his retirement pass without showing in some way that they recognised in him the corner-stone upon which the greatness of their society was to be built. Mr. Boon was also a great worker in the Labor cause. He was connected with the Port Adelaide Working Men's Association, the United Labor Party, and the Democratic Club. He was president of the local branch of the Labor Party, and also treasurer. He took a practical interest in municipal matters, and on one occasion contested a seat in the Port City Council in the interests of his party. When the local Model Parliament was in existence many years ago he was one of the chief debaters. He left a widow, four sons and a daughter. Thursday 26 November 1914

By the death of our first manager, Mr. W. F. Boon, which took place recently, the cause of co-operation will be the poorer. Mr. Boon was whole heart and soul in the principle, and his almost last words, as contained in a letter written by his son, was an expression of confidence in the future of the Port Adelaide Co-operative Society and its management. Wednesday 3 March 1915.

William died at Cheltenham on November 25 1914 aged 65 years

Contemporary press clippings:


From the Daily Herald, 26 November 1914

Mr. William Flitcroft Boon was born in Stockport, England, on February 4, 1840. He arrived in South Australia in 1880, accompanied by his wife and three sons. They were passengers by the steamer Sorata, which ran aground near Cape Jervis, at which place the passengers were landed, as the position of the vessel was serious.

Mr. Boon proceeded to Sydney, but almost immediately returned to South Australia, and settled in the Port Adelaide district. About 30 years ago he removed to Cheltenham, where with his family he had resided ever since. The Port Adelaide Co-operative Society came into existence through Mr. Boon's efforts in 1896. He had obtained practical knowledge of co-operation prior to leaving England, and his whole-hearted enthusiasm and business capacity gave the society a sound foundation.

Mr. Boons efforts had a bad effect on his health, and on February 22, 1913, he was relieved of the managerial responsibility, though he still acted as assistant secretary. He was widely known and much beloved by those brought into touch with him. At the time of his retirement from the secretary ship of the society he was presented with an address and a gold watch and chain and medal.

Mr. L. W. George, on behalf of the staff and members, in voicing appreciation of Mr. Boon, said he did not know of any man who would do more than Mr. Boon had done for the society. The struggle during the opening years of their history was borne by Mr. Boon with great courage, and by his untiring efforts he won the admiration and esteem of them all. They felt they could not let the occasion of his retirement pass without showing in some way that they recognised in him the corner-stone upon which the greatness of their society was to be built. Mr. Boon was also a great worker in the Labor cause. He was connected with the Port Adelaide Working Men's Association, the United Labor Party, and the Democratic Club. He was president of the local branch of the Labor Party, and also treasurer. He took a practical interest in municipal matters, and on one occasion contested a seat in the Port City Council in the interests of his party. When the local Model Parliament was in existence many years ago he was one of the chief debaters. He left a widow, four sons and a daughter Thursday 26 November 1914.

By the death of our first manager, Mr. W. F. Boon, which took place recently, the cause of co-operation will be the poorer. Mr. Boon was whole heart and soul in the principle, and his almost last words, as contained in a letter written by his son, was an expression of confidence in the future of the Port Adelaide Co-operative Society and its management.